• Native Americans
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  • 12.02.2024
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1
Pre­con­cep­ti­ons and Mis­con­cep­ti­ons

1
What do you think of when you hear “Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans “?
  • Add your ideas to a word cloud on­line.
  • Plea­se write only key words and not whole sen­ten­ces!
2
Watch the video and take notes on the fol­lo­wing ques­ti­ons below.
  • What did the teacher do that cau­sed such an ou­tra­ge?
  • Why is her be­ha­vi­or pro­ble­ma­tic?
  • Do you think it is ju­sti­fied that the teacher was placed on leave?
Video Appears To Show California Teacher Mocking Native Americans
A California teacher was placed on administrative leave after a student captured video of the teacher mocking Native Americans ...
YouTube-Video
Pre­con­cep­ti­ons - Mis­con­cep­ti­ons

As nouns, the dif­fe­rence bet­ween pre­con­cep­ti­on and mis­con­cep­ti­on is that pre­con­cep­ti­on is an opi­ni­on for­med be­fo­re ob­tai­ning ade­qua­te evi­den­ce, es­pe­cial­ly as the re­sult of bias or pre­ju­di­ce while mis­con­cep­ti­on is a mista­ken be­lief, a wrong idea.

Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month

In order to fight com­mon mis­con­cep­ti­ons re­gar­ding Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans, No­vem­ber was de­cla­red Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month, or as it is com­mon­ly re­fer­red to, Ame­ri­can In­di­an and Alas­ka Na­ti­ve He­ri­ta­ge Month in 1990.

The month is a time to ce­le­bra­te rich and di­ver­se cul­tures, tra­di­ti­ons, and his­to­ries and to ack­now­ledge the im­portant con­tri­bu­ti­ons of Na­ti­ve people. He­ri­ta­ge Month is also an op­por­tu­ne time to edu­ca­te the ge­ne­ral pu­blic about tri­bes, to raise a ge­ne­ral awa­re­ness about the uni­que chal­len­ges Na­ti­ve people have faced both his­to­ri­cal­ly and in the pre­sent, and the ways in which tri­bal ci­ti­zens have worked to con­quer these chal­len­ges.

3
Ordne zu!
  • grün
  • blau
  • Himmel
  • Wiese

2
Pre­si­dent John Biden on Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month

1
On Oc­to­ber 31, 2022, John Biden pu­blished a procla­ma­ti­on to com­me­mo­ra­te Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month.
  • Read the first part of his procla­ma­ti­on in the speech bub­ble below.
  • What does he say about the his­to­ric re­la­ti­on­ship bet­ween Ame­ri­ca (i.e. sett­lers and the sub­se­quent go­vern­ments) and Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans? High­light im­portant parts. You may also take notes.
  • Write down any other his­to­ric events that shaped the re­la­ti­on­ship bet­ween Ame­ri­ca and Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans that you may know.
Pre­si­dent Biden

Du­ring Na­ti­o­nal Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month, we ce­le­bra­te In­di­ge­nous peo­ples past and pre­sent and re­de­di­ca­te our­sel­ves to ho­no­ring Tri­bal so­v­er­eig­n­ty, pro­mo­ting Tri­bal self-​determination, and uphol­ding the United Sta­tes’ so­lemn trust and tre­a­ty re­spon­si­bi­li­ties to Tri­bal Na­ti­ons.



Ame­ri­ca has not al­ways de­li­ver­ed on its pro­mi­se of equal di­gni­ty and re­spect for Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans. For cen­tu­ries, bro­ken tre­a­ties, dis­pos­ses­si­on of an­ces­tral lands, and po­li­ci­es of as­si­mi­la­ti­on and ter­mi­na­ti­on sought to de­ci­ma­te Na­ti­ve po­pu­la­ti­ons and their ways of life. But de­spi­te this pain­ful his­to­ry, In­di­ge­nous peo­ples, their go­vern­ments, and their com­mu­nities have per­se­ver­ed and flou­ris­hed. As teachers and scho­lars, sci­en­tists and doc­tors, wri­ters and ar­tists, busi­ness lea­ders and elec­ted of­fi­ci­als, he­roes in uni­form, and so much more, they have made im­me­a­su­ra­ble con­tri­bu­ti­ons to our coun­try’s pro­gress.

3
A Time­line of Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can his­to­ry

1
Sort the events in Native American history chronologically.
(1-15)
  • The U.S. establishes the Office of Indian Affairs.
  • The land that would become the United States is inhabited by various historic tribes such as the Apache, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Navajo, and Sioux.
  • The Wounded Knee Massacre takes place in South Dakota. Two hundred Native American women and children are killed.
  • The beginning of the French and Indian War between France and Great Britain. Indian tribes are involved on both sides.
  • The Homestead Act is passed by the U.S. government opening Indian land in the Midwest to settlers.
  • Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa leads a rebellion against the British in the Ohio River Valley.
  • Charles Curtis becomes the first Native American U.S. Senator. He would later become vice president of the United States.
  • Christopher Columbus makes contact with native people on the island of San Salvador. He calls them Indians because he mistakenly thinks he has landed in the East Indies.
  • All Native American Indians are declared citizens of the United States.
  • Tecumseh begins to put together his confederation of Native American Tribes in an effort to stop the expansion of the United States.
  • The Cherokee are forced to march from North Carolina to Oklahoma. Thousands of them die along the way in what will be known as the Trail of Tears.
  • George Custer and the U.S. Army is soundly defeated at the Battle of Little Big Horn by Native Americans led by Sitting Bull.
  • Native Americans under Tecumseh ally with the British against the United States in the War of 1812.
  • Tribal people begin to develop across North America.
  • President Andrew Jackson signs the Indian Removal Act into law.
Dates

Add the dates to the cor­re­spon­ding events when you have fi­nis­hed.

5000 BC - 1400s - 1492 - 1754 - 1764 - 1810 - 1812 - 1824 - 1830 - 1838 - 1862 - 1876 - 1890 - 1907 - 1969

4
Zoom on: The Che­ro­kee People

1
What does “home” mean to you? Take notes.
  • Have you ever had to leave your home (e.g. be­cau­se you moved)? How did that make you feel?
    If not, try and ima­gi­ne the fee­ling.
    Write down your thoughts.
2
Read the quo­tes by dif­fe­rent mem­bers of the Che­ro­kee tribe below.
  • What does “home­lands” mean to them, geo­gra­phi­cal­ly as well as emo­ti­o­nal­ly?
    Take notes in the table on the next page.
  • You can also watch a clip by the Smith­so­ni­an “Na­ti­o­nal Mu­se­um of the Ame­ri­can In­di­an” if you fol­low the link or scan the QR code.
    https://l.fo­bizz.com/c1c1a4d7

Tran­script: Pro­tec­ting Home­lands

Bill John Baker, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief, 2011–2019:

"Be­fo­re re­moval the Che­ro­kees had their ori­gi­nal home­land was in the sou­the­ast. It was Geor­gia, Ten­nes­see, part of Ala­ba­ma, North Ca­ro­li­na, South Ca­ro­li­na, and even Ken­tu­cky. It was a vast area that the Che­ro­kees owned and con­trol­led."

Ca­the­ri­ne Foreman-​Gray, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on His­to­ri­an:

"Che­ro­kees are very tied to our tra­di­ti­o­nal home­lands. That was so­me­thing that was given to us by the crea­tor, and it's al­ways been very sa­cred ground."

S. Joe Crit­ten­den, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on De­pu­ty Chief, 2011–2019:

"It's where we have our roots. It's where we have pre­cious me­mo­ries of el­ders and bu­ri­al grounds and all of those things that make the me­a­ning of life what it is."

Madi­son White­kil­ler, Miss Che­ro­kee 2017:

"Just going back to the home­lands, you get a sense of home. It's just breath ta­king, and you feel a sense of com­fort while being there."

Chuck Hoskin Jr., Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief:

"As we began to in­ter­act with the Eu­rope­ans and the co­lo­nists, as we began to trade with them, as we began to have ten­si­ons with them over land and re­sour­ces, we began to deal with them on a go­vern­ment to go­vern­ment basis. And so we ad­ap­ted our go­vern­ment in a way to pro­tect our own re­sour­ces and to deal with the world around us."

Madi­son White­kil­ler, Miss Che­ro­kee 2017:

"We have al­ways been a people who have ad­ap­ted, and grown with the chan­ging world around us. But we re­al­ly held strong to not only our lan­guage but our his­to­ry, and our cul­tu­re, and our tra­di­ti­ons while doing all that ever­y­o­ne else did."

Bill John Baker, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief, 2011–2019:

"It is like a re­li­gious ex­pe­ri­ence to go back and feel Geor­gia and Ten­nes­see and North Ca­ro­li­na. And a peace that comes over you that you know it's home."



 Ame­ri­can­In­di­an.si.edu/NK360 1



Tran­script: Pro­tec­ting Home­lands

Bill John Baker, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief, 2011–2019:

"Be­fo­re re­moval the Che­ro­kees had their ori­gi­nal home­land was in the sou­the­ast. It was Geor­gia, Ten­nes­see, part of Ala­ba­ma, North Ca­ro­li­na, South Ca­ro­li­na, and even Ken­tu­cky. It was a vast area that the Che­ro­kees owned and con­trol­led."

Ca­the­ri­ne Foreman-​Gray, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on His­to­ri­an:

"Che­ro­kees are very tied to our tra­di­ti­o­nal home­lands. That was so­me­thing that was given to us by the crea­tor, and it's al­ways been very sa­cred ground."

S. Joe Crit­ten­den, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on De­pu­ty Chief, 2011–2019:

"It's where we have our roots. It's where we have pre­cious me­mo­ries of el­ders and bu­ri­al grounds and all of those things that make the me­a­ning of life what it is."

Madi­son White­kil­ler, Miss Che­ro­kee 2017:

"Just going back to the home­lands, you get a sense of home. It's just breath ta­king, and you feel a sense of com­fort while being there."

Chuck Hoskin Jr., Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief:

"As we began to in­ter­act with the Eu­rope­ans and the co­lo­nists, as we began to trade with them, as we began to have ten­si­ons with them over land and re­sour­ces, we began to deal with them on a go­vern­ment to go­vern­ment basis. And so we ad­ap­ted our go­vern­ment in a way to pro­tect our own re­sour­ces and to deal with the world around us."

Madi­son White­kil­ler, Miss Che­ro­kee 2017:

"We have al­ways been a people who have ad­ap­ted, and grown with the chan­ging world around us. But we re­al­ly held strong to not only our lan­guage but our his­to­ry, and our cul­tu­re, and our tra­di­ti­ons while doing all that ever­y­o­ne else did."

Bill John Baker, Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on Prin­ci­pal Chief, 2011–2019:

"It is like a re­li­gious ex­pe­ri­ence to go back and feel Geor­gia and Ten­nes­see and North Ca­ro­li­na. And a peace that comes over you that you know it's home."



 Ame­ri­can­In­di­an.si.edu/NK360 1







5





10




15





20





25




Geographical homelands of the Cherokees

Emotional homelands of the Cherokees





3
De­scri­be and com­pa­re the pain­tings.
  • What do they tell you about the life­style of the Che­ro­kees?
4
Read the text about pre­cont­act Che­ro­kee life­style and add the mis­sing words from the box below.

Che­ro­kee so­cie­ty be­fo­re cont­act with was tra­di­ti­o­nal­ly or­ga­ni­zed around a ma­tri­li­ne­al clan, or fa­mi­ly, sys­tem: child­ren were born into the clan of their . When a woman mar­ri­ed, her hus­band would join her house­hold and their child­ren would be mem­bers of the mo­ther’s clan. Che­ro­kee towns were , each ha­ving its own coun­cil house, war­ri­ors, and lea­ders. Che­ro­kee hun­ted to pro­vi­de meat and hides for clo­thing, lodging, and other items. grew corn, beans, squash, and to­b­ac­co, and they gathe­red a va­rie­ty of na­ti­ve plants. In the spring of 1540, ex­plo­rer Her­nan­do de Soto en­te­red the Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on in sou­the­as­tern North Ame­ri­ca. This was the first known bet­ween Che­ro­kee people and Eu­rope­ans. By the late 1600s, Che­ro­kee people were en­te­ring into trade re­la­ti­on­ships with Eu­rope­ans that brought cloth, metal, and fire­arms to the tribe.

The French and In­di­an War (1754–1763) and the Re­vo­lu­ti­o­na­ry War (1775–1783) pul­led the Che­ro­kee and other Na­ti­ve Na­ti­ons into con­flict. They sided with the en­ti­ty that could offer the most be­ne­fi­ci­al .

With the ar­ri­val of Eu­rope­ans in North Ame­ri­ca, Che­ro­kee lea­ders felt it was im­portant to es­tab­lish government-​to-government re­la­ti­on­ships with them for the pro­tec­tion and of Che­ro­kee people.

In March 1832, the U.S. Su­pre­me Court es­tab­lished the Che­ro­kee and other tri­bes as na­ti­ons within the United Sta­tes.

Mis­sing words

al­li­ance - so­v­er­eign - in­ter­na­ti­o­nal - mo­ther - in­de­pen­dent - en­coun­ter - Eu­rope­ans - men - cont­act - women - Spa­nish - Ame­ri­can - ad­vance­ment - edi­ble

5
In your opi­ni­on, what are the three most im­portant/in­te­resting bits of in­for­ma­ti­on in the text about the Che­ro­kee people?
  • High­light these parts in the text and note them in your own words.
6
Dis­cuss the ques­ti­ons below.
  • What kinds of de­ci­si­ons did the Che­ro­kee Na­ti­on face when Eu­rope­an Na­ti­ons—and later the United Sta­tes—en­cro­a­ched on its home­lands?
  • What is the si­gni­fican­ce of the U.S. Su­pre­me Court es­tab­li­shing the Che­ro­kee and other tri­bes as so­v­er­eign na­ti­ons within the United Sta­tes?
7
The west­ward ex­pan­si­on of the sett­lers had an im­pact on Che­ro­kee ter­ri­to­ry.
  • Ana­ly­ze the map below and note chan­ges in the size of their lands. Com­ment on this de­ve­lo­p­ment.

5
1830-1838: The Re­moval of a Na­ti­on

1
The In­di­an Re­moval Act (1830)
  • Ana­ly­ze the meme and the info box on the In­di­an Re­moval Act. Add im­portant in­for­ma­ti­on to the table below.
  • Ex­plain the In­di­an Re­moval Act and its im­pact for Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans in your own words.
In­di­an Re­moval Act (1830)

The In­di­an Re­moval Act was si­gned into law by Pre­si­dent An­drew Jack­son on May 28, 1830, autho­ri­zing the pre­si­dent to grant lands west of the Mis­sis­sip­pi in ex­chan­ge for In­di­an lands in the South-​East - which would be va­lu­a­ble to grow cot­ton - within exis­ting state bor­ders. A few tri­bes went peace­ful­ly, but many re­sis­ted the re­lo­ca­ti­on po­li­cy.

What?



Who?



Why?



Consequences?



2
The Trail of Tears (1838)
  • Watch the video and take notes in the table
  • Com­pa­re your re­sults with your part­ner.
A Brief History Of The Trail of Tears
YouTube-Video

What?



Who?



Why?



Consequences?



3
You want to know more?
  • Watch the video “The In­di­an Pro­blem” for a more in-​depth por­t­ra­yal of Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans in the 19th cen­tu­ry.
The “Indian Problem”
YouTube-Video

6
Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans Today

1
Ana­ly­ze these pho­tos of mem­bers of the Che­ro­kee na­ti­on.
  • De­scri­be the pho­tos.
  • What do they imply about the si­tu­a­ti­on of Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans today? Ex­plain
2
Lis­ten to the text about the si­tu­a­ti­on of Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans today.
  • Take notes.
  • Crea­te a mind-​map with your notes.
  • High­light the most im­portant / sur­pri­sing points.
3
Read the fol­lo­wing ex­tract from Pre­si­dent Biden’s procla­ma­ti­on on Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month.
  • List what the Biden ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on does for Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans.
  • Com­ment on these ef­forts.

We must do more to en­su­re that Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans have every op­por­tu­ni­ty to suc­ceed and that their ex­per­ti­se in­forms our Fe­de­ral policy-​making.  That is why my Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on is en­ga­ging in me­a­ning­ful con­sul­ta­ti­on with Tri­bal lea­ders, parti­cu­lar­ly when it comes to tre­a­ty rights, re­ser­ved rights, ma­nage­ment and ste­ward­ship of Fe­de­ral lands, con­side­ra­ti­on of In­di­ge­nous Know­ledge, and other po­li­ci­es that af­fect Na­ti­ve peo­ples.  That is also why I ap­poin­ted Se­creta­ry Deb Haa­land to be the first-​ever Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can Ca­bi­net Se­creta­ry, and why more than 50 Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans now serve in si­gni­fi­cant roles across the exe­cu­ti­ve branch.

Me­an­while, we are crea­ting new jobs in Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can com­mu­nities and bols­te­ring in­fra­struc­tu­re in Tri­bal areas.  My Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on’s Ame­ri­can Res­cue plan made the largest-​ever in­vest­ment in In­di­an Coun­try to help Tri­bal Na­ti­ons com­bat the COVID-​19 pan­de­mic and to sup­port Tri­bal eco­no­mic re­co­very.  My Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on’s Bi­par­ti­san In­fra­struc­tu­re Law se­cu­red more than $13 bil­li­on ex­clu­si­ve­ly for Na­ti­ve com­mu­nities to de­li­ver high-​speed in­ter­net to Tri­bal lands, build safer roads and bridges, mo­der­ni­ze sa­ni­ta­ti­on sys­tems, and pro­vi­de clean drin­king water — all while put­ting people to work.  Th­rough the In­fla­ti­on Re­duc­tion Act, we are lowe­ring the price of health care co­verage and cap­ping drug costs for In­di­ge­nous fa­mi­lies.  We are em­power­ing Tri­bes to fight drought, im­pro­ve fi­she­ries, and tran­si­ti­on to clean en­er­gy as part of the most si­gni­fi­cant cli­ma­te in­vest­ment this Na­ti­on has ever made.  Those in­vest­ments in­clu­de cli­ma­te ad­ap­ta­ti­on plan­ning and community-​led re­lo­ca­ti­on ef­forts, fun­ding a Tri­bal Elec­tri­fi­ca­ti­on Pro­gram to pro­vi­de power to un­elec­tri­fied homes, ma­king En­vi­ron­men­tal Ju­sti­ce Block Grants availa­ble to help al­le­vi­a­te le­ga­cy pol­lu­ti­on, bols­te­ring con­ser­va­ti­on pro­grams across the coun­try, and res­to­ring pro­tec­tions for tre­a­su­red lands that In­di­ge­nous peo­ples have ti­re­less­ly ste­war­ded, such as Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase-​Escalante Na­ti­o­nal Mo­nu­ment.

We are also hel­ping Na­ti­ve com­mu­nities heal from in­ter­ge­nera­ti­o­nal trau­ma cau­sed by past po­li­ci­es.  Last year, the De­part­ment of the In­te­ri­or laun­ched the Fe­de­ral In­di­an Boar­ding School In­iti­a­ti­ve to shed light on the harm­ful his­to­ry of forced cul­tu­ral as­si­mi­la­ti­on at these aca­de­mic in­sti­tu­ti­ons.  We are in­vesting in Tri­bal lan­guage re­vi­ta­liza­ti­on, pro­tec­ting Tri­bal vo­ting rights, and working with Tri­bal part­ners to ta­ck­le the cri­sis of mis­sing or mur­de­red In­di­ge­nous people.

As we look ahead, my Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on will con­ti­nue to write a new and bet­ter chap­ter in the story of our Nation-​to-Nation re­la­ti­on­ships.  We will de­fend Tri­bal so­v­er­eig­n­ty, self-​government, self-​determination, and the home­lands of Tri­bal Na­ti­ons.  We will sup­port Tri­bal eco­no­mies, re­co­gni­zing that Tri­bal go­vern­ments pro­vi­de a vast array of phy­si­cal in­fra­struc­tu­re, so­cial ser­vices, and good-​paying jobs that be­ne­fit their ci­ti­zens and sur­roun­ding com­mu­nities.  We will keep figh­ting for bet­ter health care, child care, edu­ca­ti­on, and housing in Tri­bal com­mu­nities.  We will al­ways honor the pro­found im­pact Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans con­ti­nue to have in sha­ping our Na­ti­on and brin­ging us clo­ser to the more per­fect Union we know we can and must be.

NOW, THE­RE­FO­RE, I, JO­SEPH R. BIDEN JR., Pre­si­dent of the United Sta­tes of Ame­ri­ca, by vir­tue of the autho­ri­ty ves­ted in me by the Con­sti­tu­ti­on and the laws of the United Sta­tes, do here­by proclaim No­vem­ber 2022 as Na­ti­o­nal Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month.  I urge all Ame­ri­cans, as well as their elec­ted re­pre­sen­ta­ti­ves at the Fe­de­ral, State, and local le­vels, to ob­ser­ve this month with ap­pro­pri­a­te pro­grams, ce­re­mo­nies, and ac­ti­vi­ties, and to ce­le­bra­te No­vem­ber 25, 2022, as Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Day.

IN WIT­NESS WHE­REOF, I have here­un­to set my hand this thirty-​first day of Oc­to­ber, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-​two, and of the In­de­pen­dence of the United Sta­tes of Ame­ri­ca the two hundred and forty-​seventh

JO­SEPH R. BIDEN JR.

We must do more to en­su­re that Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans have every op­por­tu­ni­ty to suc­ceed and that their ex­per­ti­se in­forms our Fe­de­ral policy-​making.  That is why my Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on is en­ga­ging in me­a­ning­ful con­sul­ta­ti­on with Tri­bal lea­ders, parti­cu­lar­ly when it comes to tre­a­ty rights, re­ser­ved rights, ma­nage­ment and ste­ward­ship of Fe­de­ral lands, con­side­ra­ti­on of In­di­ge­nous Know­ledge, and other po­li­ci­es that af­fect Na­ti­ve peo­ples.  That is also why I ap­poin­ted Se­creta­ry Deb Haa­land to be the first-​ever Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can Ca­bi­net Se­creta­ry, and why more than 50 Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans now serve in si­gni­fi­cant roles across the exe­cu­ti­ve branch.

Me­an­while, we are crea­ting new jobs in Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can com­mu­nities and bols­te­ring in­fra­struc­tu­re in Tri­bal areas.  My Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on’s Ame­ri­can Res­cue plan made the largest-​ever in­vest­ment in In­di­an Coun­try to help Tri­bal Na­ti­ons com­bat the COVID-​19 pan­de­mic and to sup­port Tri­bal eco­no­mic re­co­very.  My Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on’s Bi­par­ti­san In­fra­struc­tu­re Law se­cu­red more than $13 bil­li­on ex­clu­si­ve­ly for Na­ti­ve com­mu­nities to de­li­ver high-​speed in­ter­net to Tri­bal lands, build safer roads and bridges, mo­der­ni­ze sa­ni­ta­ti­on sys­tems, and pro­vi­de clean drin­king water — all while put­ting people to work.  Th­rough the In­fla­ti­on Re­duc­tion Act, we are lowe­ring the price of health care co­verage and cap­ping drug costs for In­di­ge­nous fa­mi­lies.  We are em­power­ing Tri­bes to fight drought, im­pro­ve fi­she­ries, and tran­si­ti­on to clean en­er­gy as part of the most si­gni­fi­cant cli­ma­te in­vest­ment this Na­ti­on has ever made.  Those in­vest­ments in­clu­de cli­ma­te ad­ap­ta­ti­on plan­ning and community-​led re­lo­ca­ti­on ef­forts, fun­ding a Tri­bal Elec­tri­fi­ca­ti­on Pro­gram to pro­vi­de power to un­elec­tri­fied homes, ma­king En­vi­ron­men­tal Ju­sti­ce Block Grants availa­ble to help al­le­vi­a­te le­ga­cy pol­lu­ti­on, bols­te­ring con­ser­va­ti­on pro­grams across the coun­try, and res­to­ring pro­tec­tions for tre­a­su­red lands that In­di­ge­nous peo­ples have ti­re­less­ly ste­war­ded, such as Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase-​Escalante Na­ti­o­nal Mo­nu­ment.

We are also hel­ping Na­ti­ve com­mu­nities heal from in­ter­ge­nera­ti­o­nal trau­ma cau­sed by past po­li­ci­es.  Last year, the De­part­ment of the In­te­ri­or laun­ched the Fe­de­ral In­di­an Boar­ding School In­iti­a­ti­ve to shed light on the harm­ful his­to­ry of forced cul­tu­ral as­si­mi­la­ti­on at these aca­de­mic in­sti­tu­ti­ons.  We are in­vesting in Tri­bal lan­guage re­vi­ta­liza­ti­on, pro­tec­ting Tri­bal vo­ting rights, and working with Tri­bal part­ners to ta­ck­le the cri­sis of mis­sing or mur­de­red In­di­ge­nous people.

As we look ahead, my Ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on will con­ti­nue to write a new and bet­ter chap­ter in the story of our Nation-​to-Nation re­la­ti­on­ships.  We will de­fend Tri­bal so­v­er­eig­n­ty, self-​government, self-​determination, and the home­lands of Tri­bal Na­ti­ons.  We will sup­port Tri­bal eco­no­mies, re­co­gni­zing that Tri­bal go­vern­ments pro­vi­de a vast array of phy­si­cal in­fra­struc­tu­re, so­cial ser­vices, and good-​paying jobs that be­ne­fit their ci­ti­zens and sur­roun­ding com­mu­nities.  We will keep figh­ting for bet­ter health care, child care, edu­ca­ti­on, and housing in Tri­bal com­mu­nities.  We will al­ways honor the pro­found im­pact Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­cans con­ti­nue to have in sha­ping our Na­ti­on and brin­ging us clo­ser to the more per­fect Union we know we can and must be.

NOW, THE­RE­FO­RE, I, JO­SEPH R. BIDEN JR., Pre­si­dent of the United Sta­tes of Ame­ri­ca, by vir­tue of the autho­ri­ty ves­ted in me by the Con­sti­tu­ti­on and the laws of the United Sta­tes, do here­by proclaim No­vem­ber 2022 as Na­ti­o­nal Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Month.  I urge all Ame­ri­cans, as well as their elec­ted re­pre­sen­ta­ti­ves at the Fe­de­ral, State, and local le­vels, to ob­ser­ve this month with ap­pro­pri­a­te pro­grams, ce­re­mo­nies, and ac­ti­vi­ties, and to ce­le­bra­te No­vem­ber 25, 2022, as Na­ti­ve Ame­ri­can He­ri­ta­ge Day.

IN WIT­NESS WHE­REOF, I have here­un­to set my hand this thirty-​first day of Oc­to­ber, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-​two, and of the In­de­pen­dence of the United Sta­tes of Ame­ri­ca the two hundred and forty-​seventh

JO­SEPH R. BIDEN JR.





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Sources:

https://youtu.be/h88YSHm466U?si=weJvPfeKfwi-​lGuO

https://www.face­book.com/rack.brand/pho­tos/a.1606119122883577/1762634830565338/?type=3

https://www.na­ti­veameri­can­he­ri­ta­ge­month.gov

https://www.white­house.gov/briefing-​room/presidential-​actions/2023/10/31/a-​proclamation-on-national-native-american-heritage-month-2023/

https://www.his­to­ry.com/to­pics/native-​american-history/native-​american-timeline

https://ame­ri­can­in­di­an.si.edu

https://youtu.be/CM8Pc­TIRb­Dk?si=mqJMBbK­fPeL­M­XukG

https://youtu.be/if-​BOZgWZPE

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