• Shakespeare - 01 - Introduction
  • 85d3c0f6
  • 04.02.2021
  • Englisch
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a)     You will be given a slip of paper with a Shakespearean phrase or the English equivalent. Read it carefully and practice it quietly. Then go around in your classroom speaking your phrase and try to find your modern or Shakespearean counterpart. When you have found your match, fill your words into the table on the transparency lying on the OHP.

Shakespearean

Modern English

b)    Together with your partner try to construct a setting where you could use five or six of the Shakespearean phrases and make a dialogue. You can add some modern phrases.

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1
2. Listen to the following song. Fill in the missing words.
Sigh No More
Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group Sigh No More · Mumford & Sons Sigh No More ℗ 2009 Mumford & Sons, Under exclusive license to Universal ...
YouTube-Video

Serve ______________ love me and mend
This is not the end
Live unbruised we are ______________
And I'm sorry
I'm sorry

Sigh no more, no more
One ______________ in sea, one on shore
My heart was never pure
you know me
you know me

And ______________ is a giddy thing
Oh man is a giddy thing
Oh man is a giddy thing
Oh man is a giddy thing

Love that will not ______________you,
dismay or enslave you,
It will set you ______________
Be more like the man
you were made to be.
There is ______________ a design,
An alignment to cry,
At my heart you see,
The beauty of love
as it was made to be

Mumford & Sons

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
Men were deceivers ever;
One foot in sea, and one on shore,
To one thing constant never.
Then sigh not so,
But let them go,
And be you blithe and bonny,
Converting all your sounds of woe
Into Hey nonny, nonny.

Sing no more ditties, sing no more
Of dumps so dull and heavy;
The fraud of men was ever so,
Since summer first was leavy.
Then sigh not so,
But let them go,
And be you blith and bonny,
Converting all your sounds of woe
Into Hey nonny, nonny.

William Shakespeare

2
Compare the two Songs. In which situation does the speaker find himself.
3
Find examples from today or the recent past, where Shakespeare has been used, or he has been referenced.
4
Give a personal comment on the question: What point is there in studying a dramatist who lived 400 years ago?
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